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Rain Gardens
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Rain Gardens

A shallow, planted depression in the landscape that reduces runoff by allowing it to soak into the ground as opposed to flowing into storm drains or surface waters. LEARN MORE

  • Rain Gardens
    Rain Gardens

    A shallow, planted depression in the landscape that reduces runoff by allowing it to soak into the ground as opposed to flowing into storm drains or surface waters. LEARN MORE

  • Rain Barrels
    Rain Barrels

    A barrel that hooks up to your gutter and reduces runoff by collecting rainwater and storing it for later use. LEARN MORE

  • Green/Blue Roofs
    Green/Blue Roofs

    A partially or completely vegetated rooftop, typically found on commercial buildings, that reduces runoff by absorbing rainfall. LEARN MORE

  • Permeable Pavements
    Permeable Pavements

    An alternative to traditional asphalt or concrete, which reduces runoff by allowing rainfall to infiltrate into the ground. LEARN MORE

  • Downspout Disconnection
    Downspout Disconnection

    A low-maintenance option that reroutes runoff from downspouts into permeable areas like your yard or rain garden. LEARN MORE

HIGHLIGHTED PR0JECTS
Quinnipiac River

Quinnipiac River Project

Rain gardens and bioretention swales are being installed in the Quinnipiac River watershed. Save the Sound and its partners are leading this effort. LEARN MORE.

Bridgeport

Bridgeport Project

The City of Bridgeport is embarking on an implementation plan for a green infrastructure demonstration project in its downtown area. LEARN MORE.

New Haven

New Haven Project

The City of New Haven has identified an area in its East Rock neighborhood for a potential green infrastructure pilot project. LEARN MORE.

WHY IT MATTERS

When it rains, impervious surfaces like driveways and streets prevent water from naturally soaking into the ground, creating stormwater runoff. Manmade structures like curbs and storm drains quickly carry stormwater runoff directly to local streams, rivers, and Long Island Sound-without any natural filtering process.

However, installing green infrastructure such as rain gardens and pervious pavers can help lessen the negative impact of stormwater runoff. LEARN MORE.

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